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15 Best Lenses for Nikon D810

Nikon’s best full-frame digital SLR camera, the D810, has a resolution of 36,3 megapixels and is capable of producing high-quality photos and films in virtually every environment. When shopping for lenses for your Nikon 810, take in mind that the high resolution of the camera will highlight any flaws in the optics, so you should steer clear of inexpensive glass. The following is a list of our recommendations for the top lenses that are compatible with the Nikon D810, including our top choices in the categories of all-in-one, wide-angle, portrait, and telephoto lenses. The FX portfolio that Nikon offers continues to expand, and in addition to the extensive choice of prime lenses, there is also a growing selection of zoom lenses available to choose from.

Below are the top recommended lenses for Nikon D810. You can choose the one you need.

15 Best Lenses for Nikon D810

1. Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8E VR

$800.00
$396.90
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If we had to choose just one lens to use with the Nikon D810, it would be the 24-70mm f/2.8 VR because it can handle anything from landscapes to portraits. Because it maintains a high level of sharpness and optical quality across the entirety of its zoom range, focuses quickly and precisely, and is constructed of a durable material that is designed to withstand repeated use, this lens is extremely well-liked among photography professionals as well as amateurs. You can save money by purchasing the Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 instead of a number of specialized prime and zoom lenses. The image quality will not suffer nearly as much as it would with the other options.

The price and the weight of the Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8 are two significant drawbacks of this lens. In spite of the fact that it may be used for a variety of purposes, the price of the lens is roughly $2,400. In addition, this lens weighs close to 38 ounces, making it the heaviest piece of glass on the list. It exceeds all of the other prime lenses and zoom lenses that aren’t telephoto. Keep in mind that we are recommending the new “E” version with Vibration Reduction technology here; the older version of the 24-70mm f/2.8 that does not have VR costs approximately $1,800 and weighs 31.8 ounces. Both of these lenses are of the highest quality.

2. Nikon 50mm f/1.4G 

One of the best FX-format prime lenses available from Nikon is the 50mm f/1.4G, which is designed specifically for portrait photographers. The lens features remarkable bokeh, excellent performance even in low light, silky smooth autofocus, and excellent sharpness throughout the frame. In addition, when contrasted with other fast prime lenses such as the 35mm f/1.4, the 50mm is noticeably more portable and less expensive. It is an excellent opportunity to add a quick, professional-level lens to your Nikon D810 set-up at a pricing point that is more affordable than $450, as it costs less than $450.

The only issues we have with the Nikon 50mm f/1.4G are not with the lens itself but rather with the other options available. On the opposite side of the aisle, Canon has upped the ante with the 50mm f/1.2, which is more expensive and heavier than the f/1.4G, but it is also a half stop faster than the f/1.4G (Nikon also has a good quality 50mm f/1.2 manual focus version, but that lens has a limited appeal). And at around one-third of the cost, the Nikon 50mm f/1.8 provides an alternative to the f/1.4 that is absolutely acceptable in its own right. However, we believe that the D810 justifies investing the extra money to get the f/1.4 lens instead of the slower f/1.8 lens. This is especially true for casual photographers and those who use DX cameras.

3. Nikon 16-35mm f/4 VR

Photography using a wide-angle lens is an entirely new beast. It is not as important to consider the bokeh while photographing landscapes as it is when photographing people, and you can get away with a smaller maximum aperture because the majority of landscape photographs are taken in well-lit environments. Although you could spend more money on the Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 below, which is also an excellent lens, we believe that this is a wonderful opportunity to save money by purchasing the wide-angle zoom with f/4.

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How do the two lenses compare to one another? To begin, the 16-35mm f/4 is approximately $800 less expensive depending on the costs at the time of this writing. Second, it has a wider range of focal lengths and, despite the fact that it cannot match the ultra-wide angle of view at 14 millimeters, it has a more practical zoom range. Third, it is over 8 ounces lighter than the original. When there is not a lot of available natural light, the 16-35mm’s major drawback is that it has a maximum aperture that is quite sluggish, which is adequate but not ideal (the lens does have vibration reduction while the 14-24mm does not). We believe that the Nikon 16-35mm f/4 is a superior value for the majority of people, despite the fact that both of these lenses are incredibly crisp and are able to take exceptional wide-angle photographs.

4. Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art

Sigma is one of our preferred third-party lens manufacturers because it produces one-of-a-kind lenses at prices that are, at times, lower than those of Nikon’s native products. In this scenario, the “Art” 35mm f/1.4 lens is not only quick and sharp but also offers an excellent bargain at roughly $900. What are you willing to give up? There is a possibility of slower autofocus compared to Nikon, and the overall build quality is not nearly as good (although this Sigma lens is pretty well made). When you first get the lens, there’s a chance you’ll need to make some adjustments to the focus, which isn’t ideal for everyone. Even though it costs nearly twice as much and is far more cumbersome, we continue to be fans of the Nikon 35mm f/1.4 lens. Congratulations are in order for Sigma on their innovative Art series, which has allowed them to become even more competitive with the industry’s leading brands.

5. Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8

The Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 is the company’s best wide-angle zoom lens, and it is capable of capturing photos that are extraordinarily sharp across their entire range. In addition, the maximum aperture of f/2.8 is really excellent, and the rapid and precise focusing provided by the Silent Wave Motor is a plus. Where does the Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 fall short in terms of its capabilities? It weighs more than 34 ounces and costs very close to two thousand dollars. You can also anticipate severe distortion at the broad end of the lens’s focal range; however, this is typical for a lens of this sort and can be adjusted in-camera using the D810’s features. The Nikon 14-24mm is a good choice for photographers who are serious about wide-angle photography, especially those that shoot ultra-wide. This includes both pros and serious amateurs.

6. Nikon 24-120mm f/4 VR lens

In addition to the comprehensive Filmmaker’s package, the Nikon D810 can be purchased with the Nikon 24-120mm f/4 lens for an additional $700 over the cost of the camera by itself. When you consider that the lens by itself might cost up to 1,300 dollars, this implies a significant cost saving for the set. The 24-120mm f/4 is not necessarily the lens of choice for top experts, but it is a reasonably priced and versatile zoom that works wonderfully with the D810, making it an excellent choice for beginners. In addition to having a quick focusing and a vibration reduction system, the lens is substantially sharper than the 24-85mm lens that was previously mentioned (and portrait shoots will love the extra 35mm of zoom). Because it has a maximum aperture of f/4 and weighs over 23 ounces, the 24-120mm lens is on the larger side, which makes it difficult to use in conditions with low levels of available natural light. However, it is still an excellent lens for beginners, and the price is really reasonable.

7. Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VR II 

Given that the Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VR II weighs in at a heavy 54.3 ounces, you may want to consider purchasing a tripod in addition to the lens when you go to make your purchase. Despite its rather heavy weight, the 70-200mm is Nikon’s most capable telephoto zoom lens, making it an excellent choice for photographing everything from sports to school plays. The autofocus is incredibly quick and precise, the lens has excellent sharpness and color reproduction, there is very little distortion, and the lens incorporates technology that minimizes vibration. Photographers who focus on wildlife will discover that a focal length of 200 millimeters is not adequate for capturing distant things; nevertheless, the available solutions become prohibitively expensive as the telephoto capacity grows (for example, the new Nikon 400mm f/2.8E).

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8. Nikon 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 VR

Because of the widespread adoption of all-in-one lenses for Nikon DX-format cameras, Nikon decided to develop a full-frame version of its 28-300mm VR zoom lens; at the moment, it is the only all-in-one lens available for full-frame cameras. You might expect obvious distortion at the extremities of the zoom range (the Nikon D810 does have automated distortion correction built into the camera), but the lens maintains its sharpness across the whole range of its zoom, and it takes photographs that are of a high quality overall. Although it weighs more than 28 ounces, the Nikon 28-300mm zoom lens is actually lighter than many of the zoom lenses listed below, such as the Nikon 14-24mm, the Nikon 24-70mm, and the Nikon 70-200mm.

9. Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 lens

We are always looking for quick wide-angle alternatives given the expensive price of the Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8 lens that was previously mentioned. The Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 is a lens that can be used instead of the Nikon because it has the same maximum aperture but costs significantly less. When considering the cost, the optics are pretty amazing, particularly in terms of their high degree of sharpness, rapid autofocus, and high level of build quality (not quite Nikon level, but good). You even get more reach than the Nikon 14-24mm despite the fact that the only thing you give up is 1mm at the wide end of the zoom range.

The Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8 lens should be ranked higher; why isn’t it? It comes in at about 2.5 pounds, which is quite a substantial weight. The fact that this lens is over 4 ounces heavier than the Nikon 14-24mm, which was already a very heavy lens, is a significant drawback for landscape photographers who must transport their own equipment deep into the wilderness. When shooting without the use of a tripod, the Tamron’s built-in vibration reduction, which they name “Vibration Compensation,” is a useful feature to have. This feature is an added plus.

10. Nikon 105mm f/2.8G VR 

If you’re looking for a macro lens that won’t break the bank (Nikon refers to this type of lens as “Micro”), the 105mm f/2.8 is our top recommendation for use with the D810. This lens is capable of handling the great majority of your macro requirements due to its excellent sharpness and minimum focusing distance of slightly more than 30 centimeters. Because it has a focal length of 105 millimeters, it can also be used as a portrait-specific short telephoto. In the majority of situations, the focusing is reasonably quick, and both the performance in low light and the bokeh are really good. The 105mm f/2.8 is a large lens that weighs over 25 ounces despite having a lot of plastic in its construction; yet, the overall image quality is really outstanding. Nikon also provides a considerably faster 105mm f/1.4 version of the lens, which costs more than twice as much but is excellent in terms of its optical quality but is only available to customers with larger budgets.

11. Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR

When paired with the D810, the Nikon 70-300mm VR is a superb choice for a telephoto zoom lens, and it offers one of the finest values of any FX lens. You may obtain photographs that are reasonably sharp across its large zoom range for less than $600, along with vibration reduction that covers up to four stops and a Silent Wave Motor that focuses swiftly (most of the time). The greatest limitation of this lens is the range of its maximum aperture, which is f/4.5-5.6. Photographers who work professionally or who frequently photograph in dim light should look into the Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 lens instead. However, for the vast majority of individuals who aren’t experts in telephoto photography, this lens is an excellent option.

12. Nikon 35mm f/1.8G

This extremely practical focal length is now accessible to a larger variety of customers as a result of the introduction of the Nikon 35mm f/1.8 lens a few years ago. Before very recently, the sole 35mm prime option for FX was the f/1.4 below, but the new f/1.8 has nicely spanned the gap between those two options. When compared to the f/1.4 lens, this one is $1,000 cheaper and offers a significant saving in terms of sharpness, focusing speed, and bokeh quality. The lens, with the exception of its mount, is nearly entirely made of plastic. This means that it won’t be able to withstand the test of time, but it does assist to keep the lens’s weight down to 10.8 ounces.

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13. Nikon 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 VR 

The rise in popularity of versatile zoom lenses, such as the Nikon 24-85mm VR, is evidence that photographers of all skill levels, from amateurs to pros, are gravitating toward these types of lenses. A great FX lens that can photograph anything from wide-angle to portraits can be purchased for less than $600. Because of this, it is an excellent walk-around lens that can be used for travel, portraits, and everyday life. The most significant drawback is the camera’s low-light performance, which is adequate but not ideal (the lens does have vibration reduction unlike the Nikon 24-70mm above). The 24-85mm has increased softness in the corners and some distortion, particularly at the wide end, when compared to some of the best prime and zoom lenses for FX cameras. If you are working with a very limited budget, this lens is still a great deal and an appealing option for those looking for budget-friendly options to match the D810.

14. Nikon 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G 

When Nikon released its 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5 lens a few years ago, the company bucked the trend of producing extremely high-priced wide-angle zoom lenses. The optics of this lens are significantly better than one might anticipate at this price point, featuring good sharpness, quick focusing, and less distortion than many of Nikon’s older wide-angle zooms. We are big fans of this lens, and we think you will be as well. Because this lens does not have vibration reduction, it is not the best option for taking pictures of sunsets or interiors that are dimly illuminated because it performs poorly in low light. However, for the vast majority of other applications, it is an excellent and cost-effective method to acquire a genuine wide-angle lens for the Nikon D810 camera.

15. Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 OS 

In the last section, we discussed the 70-200mm f/2.8 and the 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6, which are two of the most widely used full-frame telephoto lenses produced by Nikon. Both of those models have some redeeming qualities, but neither of them can compare to the extremely extended zoom range of the Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 lens. This lens provides the kind of zoom that you want and needs while maintaining a price point that is less than one thousand dollars, making it ideal for uses such as photographing birds and wildlife in natural light.

The Sigma 150-600mm is a choice that comes with a number of significant trade-offs. To begin, the maximum aperture of f/5-6.3 is the slowest on this list, which indicates that the lens may have a difficult time focusing in low light conditions (although you do get Sigma’s Optical Stabilizer to assist you). This lens is a monster in both weight and size, coming in at a whopping 68.8 ounces (that is not a typo), so you’ll almost likely want to make use of a tripod when shooting with it. Although the image quality may not quite measure up to the standards of Nikon’s professional-level telephoto versions, this lens is a fun option for daylight wildlife photography and offers a fair value.

Lens Comparison Table

LENS

CATEGORY

WEIGHT

MAX. APERTURE

VR

FILTER

Nikon 24-70mm f/2.8E VR

Portrait/travel

37.8 oz.

f/2.8

Yes

82mm

Nikon 50mm f/1.4G

Portrait

12.7 oz.

f/1.4

No

58mm

Nikon 16-35mm f/4 VR

Wide angle

24 oz.

f/4

Yes

77mm

Sigma 35mm f/1.4 Art

Travel

23.5 oz.

f/1.4

No

67mm

Nikon 14-24mm f/2.8

Wide angle

34.2 oz.

f/2.8

No

77mm

Nikon 24-120mm f/4 VR

Kit/travel zoom

23.6 oz.

f/4

Yes

77mm

Nikon 70-200mm f/2.8 VR II

Telephoto

54.3 oz.

f/2.8

Yes

77mm

Nikon 28-300mm f/3.5-5.6 VR

All-in-one

28.2 oz.

f/3.5

Yes

77mm

Tamron 15-30mm f/2.8

Wide angle

38.9 oz.

f/2.8

Yes

N/A

Nikon 105mm f/2.8G VR

Macro

25.4 oz.

f/2.8

Yes

62mm

Nikon 70-300mm f/4.5-5.6 VR

Telephoto

26.3 oz.

f/4.5

Yes

67mm

Nikon 35mm f/1.8

Travel

10.8 oz.

f/1.8

No

58mm

Nikon 24-85mm f/3.5-4.5 VR

Travel zoom

16.4 oz.

f/3.5

Yes

72mm

Nikon 18-35mm f/3.5-4.5G

Wide angle

13.6 oz.

f/3.5

No

77mm

Sigma 150-600mm f/5-6.3 OS

Telephoto

68.8 oz.

f.5

Yes

95mm

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